www.testfreaks.com

Reviews, reviews, reviews...

Apple MacBook Air  13" A1369 2011- (MC965 / MC966)
5.8 out of 10

Apple MacBook Air 13" A1369 2011- (MC965 / MC966)

Great Deal: $1,199.00

Reviews and Problems with Apple MacBook Air 13" A1369 2011- (MC965 / MC966)

Showing 1-10 of 29
Overall 9
9.0

MacBook Air (13-inch, 2011)

MacNN
30 August 2011
  • Excerpt: The Good Dramatically faster for both everyday and serious work. Better value than most Windows-based opponents. Battery life still holds up with the added speed. 4GB of RAM now standard on 13-inch models. Thunderbolt opens up fast storage, docking possibilities. Backlit keyboard returns at last.
  • Pros: Dramatically faster for both everyday and serious work., Better value than most Windows-based opponents., Battery life still holds up with the added speed., 4GB of RAM now standard on 13-inch models., Thunderbolt opens up fast storage, docking possibilities., Backlit keyboard returns at last., Li...
  • Cons: No more than 4GB of RAM and a 256GB SSD., Can't be user-upgraded., Not as fast as costlier rivals., Battery life could still be longer., Display isn't as vivid as on a MacBook Pro or similar.
  • Read full review
Overall 9
8.6
Performance 9
9.2
Battery performance 9
9.1
Display 8
7.5
Weight 9
9.3
Noise 9
9.4
Gaming performance 7
6.7
Connectivity 6
5.5
Keyboard 9
9.2
Temperature 9
8.5

Review Apple MacBook Air 13 Mid 2011 (1.7 GHz, 256 GB SSD) Subnotebook

Notebookcheck
26 August 2011
  • Summary: Turbo Air. After the refresh of the Air’s case in autumn of last year, we now see completely new internal hardware based on Intel’s Sandy Bridge technology. The extremely thin aluminium chassis remains unchanged, still setting the bar for attractiveness, overall feel, and slenderness.
  • Pros: Low weight and small size, Outstanding aluminium case, Very good input devices, Backlit keyboard, Very good application performance for a subnotebook, Everything good about the previous model, but with significantly more power under the hood.
  • Cons: Relatively expensive, Not so many ports, Reflective display, Non-upgradeable system memory, A large range of Thunderbolt accessories.
  • Read full review
Overall 9
8.6
Performance 9
9.2
Battery performance 9
9.1
Display 8
7.5
Weight 9
9.3
Noise 9
9.4
Gaming performance 7
6.7
Connectivity 6
5.5
Keyboard 9
9.2
Temperature 9
8.5

Review Apple MacBook Air 13 Mid 2011 (1.7 GHz, 256 GB SSD) Subnotebook

Notebookcheck
26 August 2011
  • Summary: Turbo Air. After the refresh of the Air’s case in autumn of last year, we now see completely new internal hardware based on Intel’s Sandy Bridge technology. The extremely thin aluminium chassis remains unchanged, still setting the bar for attractiveness, overall feel, and slenderness.
  • Pros: Low weight and small size, Outstanding aluminium case, Very good input devices, Backlit keyboard, Very good application performance for a subnotebook, Everything good about the previous model, but with significantly more power under the hood.
  • Cons: Relatively expensive, Not so many ports, Reflective display, Non-upgradeable system memory, A large range of Thunderbolt accessories.
  • Read full review
Overall 10
10

Apple MacBook Air (2011)

stuffmideast.com
2 August 2011
  • Summary: Now with the power to match its iconic looks, the Air has evolved into the world’s best everyday laptop
  • Read full review
Overall 9
9.0

Review: 13″ MacBook Air (2011)

gadgetsteria.com
25 July 2011
  • Conclusion: The new MacBook Air hardware combined with Apple’s latest version of OS X — OS X Lion — is a powerful 1-2 punch that should please most OS X users new and old. While some may be put off by the heavy iOS undertones, we feel Apple’s attempts to blend the mobile and traditional desktop computing...
  • Read full review
Overall 9
8.8
Design 9
9.0
Performance 8
8.0
Battery performance 9
9.0
Display 9
9.0
Keyboard 9
9.0
Software 9
9.0

Apple MacBook Air review (13-inch, mid 2011)

theverge.com
22 July 2011
  • Excerpt: The original MacBook Air was more of a status symbol than a computer. Sure, it was a functional laptop that could glide into a manila envelope, but the $1,799 laptop was, by and large, a secondary machine — it trailed behind other ultraportables in performance, lacked some essential ports (it only...
  • Pros: Double the performance of the last gen Air, Over six hours of battery life, Best touchpad around, Backlit keyboard returns
  • Cons: Keys are a bit shallow, Webcam isn’t HD, No high resolution or matte screen option
  • Read full review
Overall 9
9.0

Expert Review

ComputerShopper
20 July 2011
  • Conclusion: That said, is this the notebook to replace the white MacBook, as Apple hopes? Being that it's more powerful, elegant, and portable than the original MacBook ever was, we think so, at least in this 13.3-inch version.
  • Pros: Thin, light, and sleek design, Hugely upgraded performance over previous version, Sturdy body, Excellent bundled software
  • Cons: Shallow keyboard, Some features require a learning curve, Mediocre battery life
  • Read full review
Overall 10
10

Apple MacBook Air (13-inch, 2011) Review

LAPTOP Magazine
20 July 2011
  • Summary: We already loved the 13-inch MacBook Air, and Apple's improvements make it the perfect notebook as far as we're concerned. When you combine a sleek ultraportable design with a great display and touchpad then nearly double the performance--without sacrificing battery life--you're left with a winner.
  • Read full review
Overall 9
9.0

Apple MacBook Air 13-inch (mid-2012)

Pocket Lint
10 July 2012
  • Conclusion: We aren't sure what has happened, but it very much appears that Apple laptops are no longer all that much more expensive than a decent PC. The Dell XPS 13 uses older tech, but still costs nearly the same as this 13-inch Air. Arguably, the Air offers a lot of advantages too.
  • Pros: Beautiful, sturdy, great keyboard and trackpad, spiffing battery life
  • Cons: Expensive, keyboard a bit squeaky, can't be upgraded
  • Read full review
Overall 10
10

Apple MacBook Air 2011 review

Stuff.tv
24 July 2011
  • Summary: Apple's original 2008 Macbook Air was like a human beatbox – a crowd-pleaser that quickly turned out to be, well, just plain annoying. The then 'world's slimmest notebook' slid from Steve Jobs' manila envelope promising a new era in ultraportable computing.
  • Read full review
Next page >>